Three ways to fix Mediocrity

Einstein-Mediocrity-Quote

When  Team’s Performance Is Mediocre, Fit It Quick

Leadership Tip of the week, adapted from HBR

What do you do when someone’s work is OK but not great? The toughest test of a manager isn’t dealing with poor performance — it’s addressing mediocrity. Don’t let lackluster performance fester.

  1. Start by showing how mediocrity negatively affects your team, the organization, and its customers. You could, for example, have middling employees listen in on calls with complaining customers so that they understand the negative effects of not doing their jobs well.
  2. It’s important to share accountability. Encourage your colleagues to immediately and respectfully confront one another when problems arise. There is no way for even the strongest supervisor to see and address every performance gap.
  3. Speak up when you see mediocrity in other parts of the organization. For example, if everyone knows that a corporate initiative isn’t working but no one is discussing it, your team will notice whether you have the integrity to point out the emperor’s lack of clothes.

High performance is a norm that needs to be defended regularly and vigilantly.

Adapted from “What to Do About Mediocrity on Your Team,” by Joseph Grenny

Advertisements

Data-driven Pop

Sprite Cherry LeBron

The Coca Cola Company is the world’s largest beverage company selling more than 500 brands of soft drink to customers in over 200 countries. It generates mountains of data – from production and distribution to sales and customer feedback, and the company relies of a solid data-driven strategy to inform business decisions at a strategic level.

In fact, Coca Cola was one of the first globally-recognized brands outside of the IT market to speak about Big Data, when in 2012 their chief big data officer, Esat Sezer, said “Social media, mobile applications, cloud computing and e-commerce are combining to give companies like Coca-Cola an unprecedented tool-set to change the way they approach IT. Behind all this, big data gives you the intelligence to cap it all off.”

Product development

Coca Cola is known to have ploughed extensive research and development resources into artificial intelligence (AI) to ensure it is squeezing every drop of insight it can from the data it collects.

 Fruits of this research were unveiled earlier this year when it was announced that the decision to launch Cherry Sprite as a new flavor was based on monitoring data collected from the latest generation of self-service soft drinks fountains, which allow customers to mix their own drinks. As the machines allow customers to add their own choice from a range of flavor “shots” to their drinks while they are mixed, this meant they were able to pick the most popular combinations and launch it as a ready-made, canned drink.

Healthy options

As sales of sugary, fizzy drink products have declined in recent years Coca Cola has also hooked into data to help produce and market some of its healthier options, such as orange juice, which the company sells under a number of brands around the world (including Minute Maid and Simply Orange).

The company combines weather data, satellite images, information on crop yields, pricing factors and acidity and sweetness ratings, to ensure that orange crops are grown in an optimum way, and maintain a consistent taste.

The algorithm then finds the best combination of variables in order to match products to local consumer tastes in the 200-plus countries around the world where its products are sold.

Social data mining

With 105 million Facebook fans and 35 million Twitter followers, social media is another hugely important source of data for the company.

Coca Cola closely tracks how its products are represented across social media, mining this gives insight into who is consuming their drinks, where their customers are, and what situations prompt them to talk about their brand. The company has used AI-driven image recognition technology to spot when photographs of its products, or those of competitors, are uploaded to the internet, and uses algorithms to determine the best way to serve them advertisements. Ads targeted in this way have a four times greater chance of being clicked on than other methods of targeted advertising, the company has said.

Watch for signs of stress on your Team

stress

Watch for Signs of Stress on Your Team

Leadership Tip of the Week

adapted from HBR

As a manager, it’s your job to watch for signs of stress on your team so that you can intervene before someone disengages, gets sick, or needs to take a leave.

Keep an eye out for the warning signs:

  • Does someone on your team seem overly tired or constantly overwhelmed?
  • Have they been unable to control their emotions lately?

Of course, everyone has good and bad days, but most people can regulate their emotions in a way that’s appropriate for the workplace. Outbursts or high and low mood swings can be a sign of stress overload.

If you notice any of these signs, start a conversation with the person. You might ask a simple question, such as “Are you OK?” or “How are you doing?”

And if the person is open to talking, mention the signs you’ve observed and express your concern.

Adapted from “An Early Warning System for Your Team’s Stress Level,” by Thomas Hellwig et al.

How to win in the age of the Digital Customer?

faces5

How to Win in the age of the Digital Customer

data pulse # 19

The Chief Customer Officer has a new agenda . Creating a Customer Obsessed Organisation and designing the human and digital customer experience are top priorities to win in the age of the Digital Customer .

This battle is not business-as-usual, for the following reasons:

  • Traditional loyalty structures are eroding, causing companies to have to work harder to retain customers or risk driving up churn.
  • Customers expect high levels of personalisation, forcing companies to design experiences as close to the individual level as possible.
  • Agile digital companies are seeking to disintermediate the relationship between both traditional digital and brick-and-mortar companies and their customers.
  • Companies must now differentiate on the experiences they deliver to customers.

Each of these forces creates challenges; more importantly, the additive impact of these forces mandates deep-rooted changes in a company’s strategy and operations.

To state the obvious, customers neither understand nor care about how hard it is to deliver consistent, quality and personalized experiences.

Taking stock, the CCO’s agenda now looks more and more like the CEO’s or COO’s agenda.

The agenda

The CCO’s agenda can be separated by a line of visibility: some pieces customers can see, and some they cannot.

Key initiatives such as strategic positioning, brand and loyalty programs are traditional CMO agenda items.

The new and most important item is designing consistent, high-quality, and personalised experiences across both human and digital touch points.

The need to differentiate on the basis of experience is really what drives the deep-rooted operational changes below the visibility line. In most cases, delivering differentiated experiences is not business-as-usual; it will require more severe structural and operational changes such that a company looks and operates differently than it does today. The CMO agenda now consists of:

  1. Making organisational changes to better align capabilities and ensure a seamless delivery of experiences across human and digital touch points.
  2. Transitioning process design from being efficiency-focused to customer-focused.
  3. Making hard changes in people and culture, including leadership, new roles, competencies and a customer-focused culture that fuels the business.
  4. Putting in place an analytics capability to enable data-driven, personalised journeys.
  5. Initiating or accelerating the business technology agenda to improve technologies that deliver customer value and drive growth.

Combined, these efforts tell us that companies, and CCOs specifically, need to think hard about making a fundamental shift in their operating model. To add to the complexity, changes to the operations across the company need to be sufficiently cohesive to ensure they don’t damage or create uneven customer experiences.

For better or worse, this is what is in front of many CCOs/ CMOs today — to lead the charge to understand the consumer mind set in the digital age and truly become a customer-obsessed organization.

This isn’t veneer or some clever tagline. It is the hard work to differentiate and win in the Age of the Digital Customer

Segmentation made simple

netflix programmes

Segmentation made simple 

data pulse #37

Delivering the most relevant, inspirational messaging and experiences through advanced segmentation and targeting is a key advanced use of data. Segmentation itself is relatively straight forward, we all do it all the time. The skill for CMO lies in bridging the technical teams and the business imperatives to develop segmentation that delivers on commercial objectives

Netflix is an organisation that uses data in three of the advanced states. Netflix micro-tagging of vast content archives allowed creation of nearly 77,000 film segments, rich data, views, searches , times, pauses and more is used to build behavioural profiles and predictive algorithms give uniquely targeted recommendations.

The segmentation techniques are not dissimilar to the segmentations that I’ve used at Tesco, Sainsbury’s and Asda . Both cluster users based on attributing product features to films / products and then clustering film watched/ products bought using analytics.

The difference is the Volume, Velocity and Veracity of data used.

Coop Food apply 7 segments to members annually,

Netflix create 77,000 segments on daily basis, continually refining which segment members are in so better able to predict your best next film.

More complex isn’t always better, as organisations need to WALK before they can RUN, and align people and processes before they build more complexity. Coop is now using customer segmentations and tools and processes for building ranges and promotional plans, and continually building and refining.

Customer focus, data-driven to deliver commercial imperatives.

Building more sophisticated segmentations will develop but add value if they are aligned to deliver commercial objectives, so creating strategic and operational capabilities

 

Grab a Breakfast at Greggs

greggs

It’s not something that you would usually associate with Greggs The Pasty Champion but they have now entered the Digital world and starting to create an omni-channel customer journey that has the potential to change the high street and take on Starbucks at their own game.

This week Greggs updated it’s new ‘Greggs Rewards’ mobile payment app designed to reward its customers for their loyalty whilst making shopping across its 1,700 shops more convenient, quicker and easier.

The rewards app is the first entirely digital loyalty scheme launched by a UK food-on-the go retailer that eliminates the need for customers to carry a separate loyalty card or their wallet when they shop.

By registering for a Greggs Rewards account via the app or online at http://www.greggs.co.uk, customers can top up their accounts with any amount from £5-£50 using their debit/credit card or with the added safety and simplicity of PayPal, allowing them to pay securely in-store with their smartphone.

Greggs Rewards will not only allow customers to pay swiftly for their purchases, but also reward them with exclusive treats and rewards built in to the app.

These offers include a free Greggs’ breakfast when opening an account with at least £20, hot drink incentives (e.g. buy 7 coffees get your next free), a birthday treat and a monthly prize draw for the chance to win an i-Pad when shopping using Greggs Rewards. Furthermore, PayPal is also giving the first 10,000 Greggs’ customers a free £5 bonus credit to spend when they sign up and register for auto-top up with PayPal.

Greggs Rewards has been developed using the Eagle Eye digital transaction network which enables retailers, in real time to connect with potential and existing customers, to deliver relevant offers, rewards and services that can be redeemed securely through any point of sale. The digital solution removes the need for paper vouchers or plastics cards, making for a seamless shopping experience that eliminates fraud.

Greggs have built a great machine with IT and payment partners the challenge exists whether they have also built the internal capability to learn how to follow the customer and add value in a segmented and targeted way.

 

 

 

 

7 Simple Steps to Data Heaven

data whowhatwhenwhy

Data pulse #43

The new European data Regulation GDPR will be coming into force soon, and many organisations still haven’t started to even be aware of the new law let along prepare for it’s arrival.

The GDPR is a real opportunity to build TRUST in the organisation , making it better for customers, simpler for colleagues and also save money! If you take a proactive approach and start to prepare soon, it could be a real opportunity rather than a Risk on the corporate Risk register.

Here are seven simple Steps to take:

  1. Map your data flows: so you understand where data exists in the organisation
  2. Map the customer Journey: does it align to the first point?
  3. Categorise your data :prioritise where you need to focus effort into priority 1/2/3
  4. Review your Partners Agree ownership and standards you expect.
  5. Evidence the standards you apply: use the DMA or ICO privacy seal
  6. Identify Resources required for Training
  7. Complete a GDPR audit: ICO will be able to help you understand where you now sit

Building awareness in the organisation of the facts as well as the simple steps that are needed to be taken will ensure that energy is focused on delivering the right outcome for customers and your organisation.