7 steps to data-driven customer obsession

seven steps

As we break for Christmas I have just had a great morning with DataIQ Leaders discussing how data can transform CX.

I led a discussion with a group of Analytical leaders with seven simple steps on the road to build advanced Customer Analytics. It’s challenging and requires commitment and alignment from around all the organisation to be successful

  1. Identify the commercial & customer Goals in next 18m-36m
  2. Build a clear vision of a radically different data-driven customer experience, working across digital & bricks & mortar and align across the organisation.
  3. Remove Silos of data use creating a single version of the truth, with a data strategy linked to business goals e.g. Unified View of customer data, GDPR ready and tools developed to meet commercial goals.
  4. Breakdown the institutional fear of data & digital at all levels through training & doing: it’s a tool that anyone can use to do what you have been doing better
  5. Use Data Analytics to Map & Prioritise customer journeys & personalised experiences across human & digital touchpoints and align organisation capability to deliver for customer.
  6. Identify & Build the capabilities (Process, Tools People) that will be required to transform process design from efficiency focused (cheaper) to customer focused (better simpler cheaper) , specifically putting in place an analytics capability to enable data-driven, personalised journeys
  7. Foster stronger bonds between technical and different business people. This is a two-way process to ensure the technical teams understand the commercial imperatives, and customer solutions you would like to build, and the business teams learn to trust the expertise of technical IT teams. It will also allow you to improve data quality through showing the business impact.

Using Data & Advanced Customer Analytics  to put the customer at the heart of an organisation is a transformation that future looking organisations need to start implementing now.

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Don’t be a Grinch this Christmas

grinch

data pulse #33

Don’t be a Grinch this Christmas , Customer data needs to be lovingly tended and developed.

It’s tempting to think of customer data as the new oil , freely flowing and always available.Combined with advanced analytics, it offers the promise of creating strategic advance. By perfectly profiling an individual customer, marketing can be truly personalized, improving a customer’s experience, and eliminating waste.

But customer data isn’t a natural resource. It’s generated by people. And as our connectivity increases, so does our awareness of the data being collected and the erosion of our privacy.

With customers increasingly seeking more control over the data they share and with whom, access to customer data will become increasingly valuable, a source of competitive advantage, and a privilege to be earned. Brands will need to demonstrate to customers that they can be trusted with their data.

There are a number of practical steps that should be taken now:

  1. Make sure you are using the data you already have to improve the customer experience, so it’s clear to customers what value they are receiving in return. This may seem obvious, yet I’m still struck by how infrequently the data I’ve shared is used to improve my experience. My inbox, for example, is still full of mass rather than personalized emails. Why not let customers feel the benefit of their data?
    1. Mothercare have a personal email programme linked to explaining what you need to do and how they can help you through weeks of pregnancy & in the first few weeks after your baby is born.
    2. Asda emails are linked to promotions in your favourite store on things we think you would like to buy based on previous shopping.
    3. Starbucks use location data to prompt offers on the phone when you are near a starbucks
  2. Give your customers more control over their data. Let them opt-in, for example, rather than have to opt-out, and be very clear what they are opting into. Be upfront about your cookie policy, and its implications. And give customers options over such questions as frequency and method of contact.  Why not work with customers to figure out ways that you can turn data they could generate into something of value to them? Nike has done this to great effect, helping customers generate data to help with their own fitness, and in the process deepening their connection with the brand.
  3. Only collect the data that’s essential to deliver the benefit to customers, rather than everything you can. And be clear about what data you need to collect, the reason why you need it, and what benefit they will get in return.

While data security is certainly a complex technical and legal challenge, it’s underpinned by a question of brand mind set.

If customer data is viewed internally as a commodity, then it’s something to be extracted from customers and traded…and customers will be wary, as behaviours will give the brand away.

But if access to customer data is viewed internally as a privilege, where we don’t own a customers data it’s their data we are only curating it and looking after it to improve our customers experience then it’s something precious that has to be protected…and the resulting behaviours will inspire more trust among customers.

 

7-11 crawl walk run

7-11 digital transformation using agile crawl- walk-run methodology to develop relevant data driven CX

Data Pulse #711

7-11 seized an opportunity to use the existing technology that most of its shoppers already had in their hands as they entered the store, and it did it from a standing start using AGILE methodology like a baby learning to CRAWL, WALK, RUN

 7-11 can now push real-time, rules-driven offers to customers through the 7-11 app.

The decision was made to launch a mobile app in efforts to deliver what the customer wants, when they want it, where they want it. Offers take account of rich data about the customer, both live and historic:

Real-time transactional: current basket, comms received, channel, geofencing

Real-time contextual: location, location temperature, time of day.

Historic modelling: transaction data, profile data, modelling scores.

Insights gained from feedback to offers over time is incorporated into business rules in a process of continuous refinement.

So, for example, on a cold morning, 7-Eleven might push hot drinks offers. At midday, some customers might receive offers for packaged lunches while others receive promotions on fresh foods. In the evening, lifestyle insights might be used to determine that some customers might be tempted by pizza and a DVD rental.

7-11 2

The battle to grow customers is not BAU.

customers 14

Data & Digital is transforming customer expectations

The battle for customers is not business-as-usual, with data & digital transforming customer expectations for personalisation, technology adoption moving fast & traditional loyalty structures changing. Creating a Customer Obsessed Organisation that puts the customer at the heart of the business and designing the human and digital customer experience are top priorities to win in the age of the Digital Customer.

Organisations grow if they have more customers visiting more often, meeting more needs of existing customers and attracting new customers: Use of Data & Digital is an opportunity to get closer to customers and do what good organisations do now better & faster.

There are several opportunities for Data & Digital to allow organisations to get closer to their customers and grow faster, and lots of learnings from other organisations that can be applied in a fast follower position.

  1. Transformational understanding of the business to make it customer focused: better, simpler and cheaper for customers, colleagues and the organisation itself
  2. Delivering a Friction Free Customer Experience
  3. Delivering the most relevant, inspirational messaging and customer experiences through advanced segmentation and targeting

The road to travel on the journey to making your organisation more customer focused in a digital world is challenging and one that requires alignment and commitment from the CEO, CCO and across different departments.

  1. Identify the commercial & customer Goals in next 18m-36m
  2. Build a clear vision of a radically different data-driven customer digital future state, working across digital & bricks & mortar and align across the organisation.
  3. Remove Silos of data use creating a single version of the truth, with a data strategy linked to business goals e.g. Unified View of customer data, GDPR ready and tools developed to meet commercial goals.
  4. Breakdown the institutional fear of data & digital at all levels through training & doing: it’s a tool that anyone can use to do what you have been doing better
  5. Use Data Analytics to Map & Prioritise customer journeys & personalised experiences across human & digital touchpoints and align organisation capability to deliver for customer.
  6. Identify & Build the capabilities (Process, Tools People) that will be required to transform process design from efficiency focused (cheaper) to customer focused (better simpler cheaper) , specifically putting in place an analytics capability to enable data-driven, personalised journeys
  7. Foster stronger bonds between technical and different business people. This is a two-way process to ensure the technical teams understand the commercial imperatives, and customer solutions you would like to build, and the business teams learn to trust the expertise of technical IT teams. It will also allow you to improve data quality through showing the business impact.

Using Data and Digital to put the customer at the heart of an organisation is a transformation that future looking organisations need to start implementing now.

Everyone Everywhere True North

customers 14.jpg

I learnt early in my career that Service organisations have millions of brand touch points delivered everyday by colleagues who interact with customers. Once you have defined the Customer Offer and Brand Story, aligning all the Brand touch points to give a consistent Brand Story is critical for success. This is the  essence of the “True North” turn around plan at Co-op Food. There are lots of ways to do this:

Tesco has implemented Yammer – an ‘enterprise social network’, allowing them to realise a vision of having ‘over half a million valued colleagues effortlessly connected and aligned:  Everyone, Everywhere’. To make this work, Tesco had to also change policies and processes: Tesco added in-store wifi and changed their policies to allow store staff to take their personal mobiles onto the shop floor.

Coop has changed the policy that allows colleagues to use their own mobile phones in the convenience shops , and they have uses several different tools ( WhatsApp, Slack ) to enable colleagues to communicate more clearly with each other. Posting pictures, chating and solving their own problems.

This has helped to create a sense of community between colleagues that extends across stores. Colleagues use the network to celebrate success, share learnings, ask questions and find answers. For example, bakers might share images of their morning display – and the service has even been used to share excess stock with nearby stores that are running low

Yammer has encouraged greater cooperation and a healthy sense of competition. Directors are also able to monitor conversations and can react quickly if required.

How to win in the age of the Digital Customer?

faces5

How to Win in the age of the Digital Customer

data pulse # 19

The Chief Customer Officer has a new agenda . Creating a Customer Obsessed Organisation and designing the human and digital customer experience are top priorities to win in the age of the Digital Customer .

This battle is not business-as-usual, for the following reasons:

  • Traditional loyalty structures are eroding, causing companies to have to work harder to retain customers or risk driving up churn.
  • Customers expect high levels of personalisation, forcing companies to design experiences as close to the individual level as possible.
  • Agile digital companies are seeking to disintermediate the relationship between both traditional digital and brick-and-mortar companies and their customers.
  • Companies must now differentiate on the experiences they deliver to customers.

Each of these forces creates challenges; more importantly, the additive impact of these forces mandates deep-rooted changes in a company’s strategy and operations.

To state the obvious, customers neither understand nor care about how hard it is to deliver consistent, quality and personalized experiences.

Taking stock, the CCO’s agenda now looks more and more like the CEO’s or COO’s agenda.

The agenda

The CCO’s agenda can be separated by a line of visibility: some pieces customers can see, and some they cannot.

Key initiatives such as strategic positioning, brand and loyalty programs are traditional CMO agenda items.

The new and most important item is designing consistent, high-quality, and personalised experiences across both human and digital touch points.

The need to differentiate on the basis of experience is really what drives the deep-rooted operational changes below the visibility line. In most cases, delivering differentiated experiences is not business-as-usual; it will require more severe structural and operational changes such that a company looks and operates differently than it does today. The CMO agenda now consists of:

  1. Making organisational changes to better align capabilities and ensure a seamless delivery of experiences across human and digital touch points.
  2. Transitioning process design from being efficiency-focused to customer-focused.
  3. Making hard changes in people and culture, including leadership, new roles, competencies and a customer-focused culture that fuels the business.
  4. Putting in place an analytics capability to enable data-driven, personalised journeys.
  5. Initiating or accelerating the business technology agenda to improve technologies that deliver customer value and drive growth.

Combined, these efforts tell us that companies, and CCOs specifically, need to think hard about making a fundamental shift in their operating model. To add to the complexity, changes to the operations across the company need to be sufficiently cohesive to ensure they don’t damage or create uneven customer experiences.

For better or worse, this is what is in front of many CCOs/ CMOs today — to lead the charge to understand the consumer mind set in the digital age and truly become a customer-obsessed organization.

This isn’t veneer or some clever tagline. It is the hard work to differentiate and win in the Age of the Digital Customer

Grab a Breakfast at Greggs

greggs

It’s not something that you would usually associate with Greggs The Pasty Champion but they have now entered the Digital world and starting to create an omni-channel customer journey that has the potential to change the high street and take on Starbucks at their own game.

This week Greggs updated it’s new ‘Greggs Rewards’ mobile payment app designed to reward its customers for their loyalty whilst making shopping across its 1,700 shops more convenient, quicker and easier.

The rewards app is the first entirely digital loyalty scheme launched by a UK food-on-the go retailer that eliminates the need for customers to carry a separate loyalty card or their wallet when they shop.

By registering for a Greggs Rewards account via the app or online at http://www.greggs.co.uk, customers can top up their accounts with any amount from £5-£50 using their debit/credit card or with the added safety and simplicity of PayPal, allowing them to pay securely in-store with their smartphone.

Greggs Rewards will not only allow customers to pay swiftly for their purchases, but also reward them with exclusive treats and rewards built in to the app.

These offers include a free Greggs’ breakfast when opening an account with at least £20, hot drink incentives (e.g. buy 7 coffees get your next free), a birthday treat and a monthly prize draw for the chance to win an i-Pad when shopping using Greggs Rewards. Furthermore, PayPal is also giving the first 10,000 Greggs’ customers a free £5 bonus credit to spend when they sign up and register for auto-top up with PayPal.

Greggs Rewards has been developed using the Eagle Eye digital transaction network which enables retailers, in real time to connect with potential and existing customers, to deliver relevant offers, rewards and services that can be redeemed securely through any point of sale. The digital solution removes the need for paper vouchers or plastics cards, making for a seamless shopping experience that eliminates fraud.

Greggs have built a great machine with IT and payment partners the challenge exists whether they have also built the internal capability to learn how to follow the customer and add value in a segmented and targeted way.